NORAD: Legends of Alien Bodies

Wikipedia notes: “North American Aerospace Defense Command…known until March 1981 as the North American Air Defense Command, is a combined organization of the United States and Canada that provides aerospace warning, air sovereignty, and protection for Northern America.Headquarters for NORAD and the NORAD/United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) center are located at Peterson Air Force Base in El Paso County, near Colorado Springs, Colorado. The nearby Cheyenne Mountain Complex has the Alternate Command Center. The NORAD commander and deputy commander (CINCNORAD) are, respectively, a United States four-star general or equivalent and a Canadian three-maple-leaf general or equivalent.”

It’s a little-known fact that now and again highly controversial tales surface concerning NORAD and nothing less than alien bodies. Of course, it’s not at all out of the question that the collective tales are simply that: tales. Indeed, as interesting as such stories are, they parallel sensational claims of (A) the U.S. Government having Bigfoot bodies hidden away at secret sites, of (B) extraterrestrial corpses held at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, and of (C) alien corpses hidden at the world’s most well-known secret base: Area 51. The stories are intriguing and eye-opening. But, so far, at least, no evidence of such bodies existing – and kept hidden behind closed doors – has ever surfaced. Worse, some of the stories come from people unwilling to share their full, real names – which effectively renders the stories useless, even if they do have some validity to them. All of which brings me back to the matter of NORAD and alien bodies.

In early 1968, Suzanne, then of Gallipolis, Ohio was told an amazing story by her father. According to the tale, Suzanne’s father decided to come clean on something that he knew of the UFO phenomenon. It was something amazing and which, if true, had a bearing on national security.. Suzanne’s father said that in 1965 and while employed at NORAD, he saw, under circumstances that he declined to explain, a series of black-and-white, aerial photographs of three small, large-headed bodies strewn around a desert floor, and which also showed a large amount of silvery, bright debris. The location, Suzanne’s father said, was New Mexico, and the photos were taken in 1947. This strongly suggests the now-famous Roswell affair of 1947 – although, admittedly, Suzanne’s father made no reference to Roswell at all. Suzanne was warned by her father not to reveal what he had told her until after his death – which occurred in 1981. Such was the concern, and even fear, in her father’s voice, however, Suzanne chose to remain silent until the late-1990s.

A very similar account surfaced from Kevin Randle and Don Schmitt – who have both dug deep into the intricacies of the Roswell affair. Commenting on those who had either direct or indirect access to actual crash- recovered exhibits of alien technology or alien remains, Schmitt and Randle stated the following in their 1991 book, UFO Crash at Roswell:  “There are others, however, who have firsthand experiences, but who did not see the bodies. They, through their work with the military, saw files containing notes about the crashes and photographs of the bodies. One of those is a man who said he worked at NORAD in Colorado Springs. In the course of computerizing some of the files, he came across one labeled: USAAF (United States Army Air Force) Early Automation. The file dealt with the recovery of several small bodies and included black and white photographs of them. The man said the bodies were small, no more than four or five feet tall, with big heads.”

NORAD jets

There’s no doubting the fact that both accounts have similarities. First and foremost, there is the NORAD connection. Second, both men – Suzanne’s father and the Schmitt-Randle source – claimed, during the course of their work at NORAD, to have seen photos of small, unusual bodies. In both cases, the photos were black-and-white. Of course, none of this proves anything at all – indeed, one story may well be a fabrication, or an elaboration, based on the other. Like the stories coming out of Area 51 and Wright-Patterson, the NORAD tales are intriguing. But, right now, that’s all they are. Unless you know better…

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